Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

take breath away

take breath away

Meaning

  • astonish; surprise; amaze or astound somebody
  • to cause someone to be out of breath because of shock or surprise
  • to be breathless because of doing heavy exercise
  • to cause an overwhelming feeling in someone due to something (grandeur, beauty, etc.)

Example Sentences

  1. The ring literally took my breath away. There was a monster of a diamond on it.
  2. The view took my breath away. Top of the mountains have always been my favourite places ever since.
  3. The hotel interior will take your breath away. It is everything that a castle should be actually.
  4. The beauty of the Swedish princess takes people’s breath away.
  5. Every time my wife walks into the room she takes my breath away. I keep falling in love with her over and over again.
  6. The moon is taking my breath away, it has never looked so big in my life!
  7. The painting is so beautiful that it took my breath away.
  8. The beauty of the princess Diana of Great Britain took my breath away.
  9. My wife looked so pretty on our wedding day that she took my breath away. She has been keeping it up ever since.

Origin

The phrase originates from the literal panting of a person when they show breathlessness due to the surprise of seeing something magnificent. Usually used when there is a surprise about the magnificence being expressed.

made it

you made it
or I made it
or we made it

Meaning

  • used to indicated the completion of a task
  • used to indicate someone’s victory
  • used to indicate someone’s arrival

Example Sentences

  1. “It is so amazing that you made it because we heard that it was a very difficult task.”
  2. “Hey, you made it! I thought you were out of town all summer?”
  3. “I heard that you made a whole week without a single drop of alcohol. Isn’t that great?”
  4. “I’m so glad that you made it! I really didn’t think you would come.”
  5. “Hey Dan, you made it! That is such an incredible news.”
  6. “I spent the entire day wondering if you would make it and then suddenly I realized that he would be busy as it was a working day.”
  7. “Jason looked forward to spending time with his dad after a year but he didn’t seem quite sure if his dad would make it.
  8. “I still look at my parents after 25 years of marriage and wonder how they made it so far.”
  9. “I knew you would make it and I believed in you since the very first day we met.”
  10. “It makes me proud to say that you made it into the university on your first attempt.”
  11. That was a real tough work but together we made it now.
  12. Oh, man I didn’t want to cross the river, but finally I made it.

Origin

The idiom ‘you made it’ has no known origin.

you bet

you bet

Meaning

  • for sure
  • most certainly
  • without any doubt
  • to agree completely
  • to express agreement
  • yes, of course

Example Sentences

  1. The manager will pull this deal off. You bet on something else about him because this is definitely happening.
  2. You bet that you will cross the finish line first. It isn’t happening with me participating in this race.
  3. Am I going to the party? You bet!
  4. Can I get another one of this? You bet!
  5. The people that live in this society are among the kindest that I know of. You bet they will go for a charity drive with you.
  6. You bet that I can get into and out of that house without anyone noticing me.
  7. You bet I will be going abroad next month to participate in social works.

Origin

The phrase is a slang which originated in the Native American way of speaking but is now popular throughout the world. It is a new phrase and has been in existence since a few decades only.

The slang came about when ‘betting’ on things to prove themselves was common and the answer to a bet would always be yes. ‘Would you take the bet?’ and ‘yes’ hence became synonyms in this phrase because no young person could say no to a bet and still be able to be a respectable member of the group.

come what may

come what may

Meaning

  • anything happens; whatever come about
  • to resolve on doing (something)
  • to be sure of going ahead in a particular situation even if all the odds are not in favour
  • to ignore the circumstances in order to get something done
  • no matter what may happen

Example Sentences

  1. The girl has decided to marry him come what may. She will proceed even if her entire family is against her decision.
  2. I have decided to go to London to complete my higher education come what may.
  3. She has promised her mother that she will pass the exam come what may this year.
  4. We will be vacationing outside the country this year come what may.
  5. My cousin is going to go to the party come what may.
  6. She got the assignment and will not finish it come what may.
  7. I am going to board that train come what may.
  8. It’s good to know that, come what may, our job is safe.

Origin

The phrase was used in the French language in the early 1300’s as “avalze que valze” which means “let it avail what it may, come what may”. Shakespeare made it popular by using it in his work ‘Macbeth’ in the year 1605. By the 1800’s it was a popular US phrase just as much as it belonged to the European English.

you’ve got to be kidding

you’ve got to be kidding

Meaning

  • implies that something that someone said is a joke
  • used when you are very surprised by what someone has said and that you disagree with them
  • used to imply that something that someone has said cannot be true

Example Sentences

  1. Dan said. “I got a job as an associate professor in the university! Wow!” Tina replied. “You’ve got to be kidding!”
  2. Samuel said. “I think I broke my permanent teeth!” His Mother replied, “You’ve got to be kidding!”
  3. You want me to drive to Chicago at this time? You’ve got to be kidding me!
  4. “Are you having breakfast at this hour of the day? You’ve got to be kidding me!”
  5. Jonathan said, “Hey do you have an extra pair of socks? I for got mine at home.” Jim replied, “You’ve got to be kidding me!”
  6. “60 dollars for a plain white top? : You’ve got to be kidding me!
  7. Leah asked her husband, “Do you think I should invite the Simpsons from across the streets for dinner?” He replied with frustration, “You’ve got to be kidding me.”
  8. “You still believe that Santa Claus exists somewhere on North pole of earth? You’ve got to be kidding me.
  9. “Is this really what they want from us? You’ve got to be kidding me!

Origin

The origin of this proverb is not known.

young blood

young blood

Meaning

  • new members that provide various new schemes and ideas for the organization
  • a young member, or group of members who are brave and more inclined to taking risks and bringing reform
  • can also be associated with a new person in the group

Example Sentences

  1. The Peace corps is in need of a young blood like Adam.
  2. They keep the young blood of today so occupied with work that they do not even have the time to look out of the window let alone lead a revolution.
  3. Tell that young blood to just zip it or else I will have him fired!
  4. The only reason why he managed to succeed is because he is always open to bringing young blood in his company and accepting ideas.
  5. The only problem with this committee is that they do not feel the need to incorporate the young blood in their decision-making processes.
  6. We need some young blood in this company, if we want to know the expectations of today’s generation and make our marketing strategies accordingly.
  7. The covert operation in Kandahar was handled completely by the young blood of the team.

Origin

The idiomatic expression ‘young blood’ is believed to be originated from the  African-American culture.

Variant

you can say that again

you can say that again

Meaning

  • used to agree with another person or group of people
  • used to express accordance with another person’s views

Example Sentences

  1. She said, “This horrible weather has been killing me.” He said, “You can say that again!”
  2. Ryan said, “That was an extremely cute outfit that baby was wearing.” Rachel replied, “You can say that again!”
  3. He said, “I am so glad that you are okay. “Robert replies, “You can say that again!”
  4. Looking at the massive mansion Andrea said, “That is a huge living space.” Crowley agreed, “You can say that again!”
  5. Alex said, “We should have voted better.” Everyone unanimously replied, “You can say that again!”
  6. He said that it  was such a difficult job to be completed in a week and Sam just laughed and replied you can say that again!
  7. I said that I think that it was impossible to finish reading the entire book in a week and he just  agreed and said you can say that again!
  8. He said, “It is impossible to draw that on a fair sheet of paper without practicing it once.” Madonna replied, “You can say that again!”
  9. I told him how stupid his decision of dropping out from the university was. He solemnly replied you could say that again.

Origin

This phrase was originated in first half of 1900s but the exact origin details of this idiomatic expression ‘you can say that’ is not known.

you know better than that

you know better than that

Meaning

  • used to express disappointment when someone makes a mistake which they probably shouldn’t have
  • used to show disapproval of someone’s actions

Example Sentences

  1. She told me that you abused her, you know better than that.
  2. You know better than that. Just go and do your homework before coming down.
  3. Oh Come on Dean, you know better than that.
  4. Father said, “Well you know better than that. Make sure you do not make the same mistake again. “Son replied arrogantly,”Okay, is that all.”
  5. Ted said, “I think I should go for this night out with them because I am sure it will be a lot of fun. “His mom replied,” I’m sure you know better than that. It is your wish though.”
  6. He childishly argued, “I want to play now, I can study later for tomorrow’s exam.” His father replied, “You know better than that. Do what you feel is correct.”
  7. She told me that you have been skipping school to spend time with her, you know better than that.
  8. Mollie asked, “Did you abuse her for using your laptop yesterday?” He replied,” It was not my fault, she should have asked me. “Mollie scolded him, “You know better than that now go apologize to her.”

Origin

The origin of this idiom is closely related to ‘know better’ but is not stated clearly.

you wish

you wish

Meaning

  • used to make a sardonic comment
  • implies that something will most likely not happen
  • used to state to someone that what they have been expecting is not possible

Example Sentences

  1. I told her that we have been dating for 5 years now and she said “you wish!”
  2. I told Summer, “Oh, I’m definitely getting a new car this summer.” She said, “you wish!”
  3. Alex said, “Do you want to go out with me for a movie tonight?” Rebecca meanly replied, “you wish!”
  4. Ronald said, “I might win a lottery worth 10k today!” Sarah replied,”you wish!”
  5. “You want a 10 pointer in every semester? you wish!”
  6. “You think she’ll ever forgive you for this? you wish!”
  7. “You think I have plans to go to Turkey during Christmas holidays? you wish!”
  8. He said, “Will you help me move this piano?” His brother replied,” Ha! you wish!”
  9. Bobby asked his elder sister, “Will you buy me my favorite candy today?” She said, “you wish!”
  10. He asked, “Will you go out with me for dinner tonight?” She said ,”you wish!”
  11. Dean said, “I might just get a new car today cause it is my birthday”. Suzanne said, “you wish!”
  12. Tina said, “I think Jason will ask me out for prom this year! I feel positive!” Katy snidely commented, “Yeah! you wish! why don’t you wait and see for yourself.”

Origin

The idiomatic expression ‘you wish’ does not have a clear origin.

 

you can’t win them all

you can’t win them all

Meaning

  • indicates the reality that it is not possible to always succeed
  • failure is inevitable and is bound to happen
  • implies that it is impossible to always keep succeeding without disappointment

Example Sentences

  1.  To be very frank, I am very disappointed that they did not give me the post of  the manager as I feel I truly deserved it after 5 years of work experience. Oh well, you can’t win them all you see.
  2. Obviously, I would have loved to win the national trophy for the school this year as well but you just can’t win them all.
  3. It would have been amazing to bag that offer for a trip to Paris you know but you can’t have it all.
  4. They published your review in the magazine but did not publish your interview? Well, you can’t win them all I guess.
  5. I expected to come first this semester as I had been scoring really well in all the exams but I guess you can’t win them all.
  6. The guy I was dating took me to meet his family and they all loved me except for his dog Tobias who kept barking at me the whole evening. I suppose you can’t win them all.

Origin

The idiom is mostly used in its informal form of ‘you can’t win em all’. The exact origin of this idiom is not well known.

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