Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms related to Business

monkey business

monkey business

Meaning:

  • silly act
  • dishonest tricks
  • to fool around
  • immoral or a deceitful conduct
  • illegal activities

Example:

  1. I want to sleep. Stop disturbing me by your monkey business.
  2. Aren’t you tired of having done monkey business whole day, leaving your preparation for test tomorrow.
  3. Children continued their monkey business until the teacher arrived in class.
  4. The government is levying fine on those who have been doing monkey business by tampering with their electricity meters.
  5. There is nothing new in selling adulterated food items in local markets by shopkeepers. It’s their old monkey business.
  6. Do not get involved in monkey business over the internet. Cyber Laws are stricter than before.
  7. Now passport application has been made available online so that innocent people do not get tricked into monkey business of those who claim to get passports made in less than 3 days.

Origin:
Monkey business has its roots in the term Monkeyshine. This word was originated in 1832 and meant “dishonorable act;” it was used in the Jim Crow song which mocked African-American slaves. In earlier times parents in England warned their children against bad conduct termed as monkey tricks. The idiom was first recorded in print in 1883 in W. Peck’s Bad Boy: “There must be no monkey business going on.”

at a discount

at a discount

Meaning:
– not valuable or not in worth
– at a lower price than usual
– below the nominal value
– held in low esteem
– out of favor
– poorly esteemed
– depreciated
– offering or selling at reduced prices

Examples:
1. Freedom fighters are at a discount in the present politics.
2. Carl bought that necklace at a discount which Emily wanted to have since last 2 years.
3. I won’t purchase an Apple iPhone until i can get one at a discount.
4. Honesty and goodness is at a discount in this selfish and cruel world.
5. It’s a winter sale at this garment shop today and you can purchase your favorite cloths at a discount.
6. Yesterday, I bought two burgers at a discount at McDonald’s restaurant.

Origin:
The first usage, mainly found in business and commerce, dates from about 1700. The figurative usage is about a century newer.

Discount synonyms:
reduction, money off, markdown, price cut, cut rate, concession and reduce

dirt cheap

dirt cheap

Meaning:
– very cheap
– almost free
– at an extremely low cost
– quite inexpensive

Examples:
1. Its quite a useful book, but luckily I could buy it dirt cheap at a junk shop.
2. Take few more of those water colors for painting they’re dirt cheap.
3. In United Kingdom, the carrots are dirt cheap.
4. Outsourcing sounds a great deal to earn money here in India, but for the people of western world it is dirt cheap.
5. The SUV truck required a huge mechanical job work, but still it was dirt-cheap.
6. I bought this welding machine dirt cheap but not working the way I want, a bad idea.
7. Don’t buy these dirt cheap electronic equipment, they are useless.

Origin:
1815–25, America.
Although the idea dates back to ancient times, the precise expression, literally meaning “as cheap as dirt,” replaced the now obsolete dog cheap. [Early 1800s]

Dirt Synonyms:
grime, filth, mud, dust, muck, soil, earth, clay.

Cheap Synonyms:
inexpensive, contemptible, despicable, low priced, economical, discounted, not expensive, shameful.

dog eat dog

dog eat dog

Meanings:
– a very competitive world
– ruthlessly competitive business environment.
– marked by destructive or ruthless competition; without self-restraint, ethics, etc.
– do anything to be successful, even if what they do harms other people
– Getting ahead in life at any cost
– a place or situation that is highly competitive

Examples:
1. The only rule of the marketplace was dog-eat-dog.
2. It’s a dog-eat-dog industry.
3. You have to look out for your own interests; it’s a dog-eat-dog world.
4. Your company fired you two days after you had a heart attack? Well, it’s certainly a dog-eat-dog world.
4. It’s a dog eat dog world out there. You have to do whatever you can to survive.
5. Many colleges are dog-eat-dog. People will compete at any cost for higher grades and not care if others get hurt in the process.
6. That school is dog-eat-dog. The students cheat and even destroy each other’s work to get better grades.”
7. In film business it’s dog eat dog – one day you’re a star, the next you’ve been replaced by younger talent.
8. In a dog eat dog world, there is intense competition and rivalry, where everybody thinks only of himself or herself.
9. In the dog eat dog world out there it pays to know who one’s real friends are.

Origin:
Present since 1930.

mean business

mean business

Meaning

  • to be focused about achieving a goal
  • to take a serious action or intend to do something very seriously
  • in the very earnest way
  • usually used in terms of going against general opinion to achieve a goal

Example Sentences

  1. She meant business when she said that she will take the number one position in the tennis world.
  2. The fire in his eyes speak that he means business.
  3. He meant business when he called the police for the continuous noise that the neighbours had been making.
  4. The driver meant business when he claimed he could get us to our destination is one night.
  5. I meant business and have finally got the contract to the biggest deal of my life.
  6. She means business and has not come so far to run around in circles.
  7. Government offices in this place do not mean business, the people employed there are very lethargic.
  8. The baby means business when he sees his toys in someone else’s hands.
  9. The firmness with which the new government has initiated certain measure shows that it mean business.

Origin

The origination comes from the seriousness that entrepreneurs adopt when conducting their business and how important it is to achieve success. But the literary origin of this phrase cannot be traced accurately.