Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms related to Death

beyond the veil

beyond the veil

Meaning:

  • In an inexplicable or concealed place or condition, especially the mysterious state of existence after death.

Example:

  • Many people have tried to discover beyond the veil but did not succeed. We only have imaginations from the stories of people with near death experiences.
  • Had the boy not been beyond the veil, he too would have been killed by the gang.
  • He seems to be beyond the veil as he doesn’t answer appropriately when asked about his business.
  • She did not want to submit her assignment as it was incomplete so she hid beyond the veil until the school got over.
  • Psychotherapists use technique of hypnosis to help patients discover the reason for their beyond the veil emotions. It has proven to be effective.
  • Aren’t you tired of pushing yourself beyond the veil? You must talk to someone to help you move past such emotion.

Origin:
Reference to the veil which concealed the deepest sanctuary of the Temple in Jerusalem i.e which in Jewish place of worship separated the main body of the Temple from the tabernacle, and derives particularly from Tyndale’s conversion of the Bible. It was afterwards taken as referring to mysterious division between the next world and this.

toll or sound the death knell

toll or sound the death knell

Meaning:
Cause an organization, system or activity to fail or end

Examples:
1. The shutdown of the local iron industry tolled the death knell for the village.
2. Recent changes of software in cell phones sound the death knell for several popular models.
3. Resign of such a loyal manager might sound the death knell for that store.

Origin:
The noun knell, used for the ringing of a bell since at least A.D. 1000, is rarely heard today except in this figurative phrase.

at death’s door

at death’s door

Meaning:
– on the point of dying
– very ill
– in serious danger of death
– very near the end of one’s life (Often an exaggeration)
– in a life-threatening state of health

Examples:
1. Most of the survivors of the airplane crash are still at death’s door.
2. Don’t overstate, it was only flu – you were barely at death’s door.
3. Jane was so ill that she was at death’s door for three days.
4. Whenever she had a bad cold she acted as though she were at death’s door.
5. Owing to coming up of malls and super market every other day in the town the old neighborhood store is at death’s door.
6. The family cat was at death’s door for three days, and then it finally died.
7. She literally was at death’s door when a kidney became available for transplant.
8. Jack lay at death’s door for over a month.
9. I do not want to lie at death’s door suffering. I hope to pass on quickly.
10. Poor Jon! He has blood cancer and I fear he’s at death’s door.
11. The young man was at death’s door after that catastrophic accident.

Origin:
The association of death with an entry way was first made in English in the late 1300s, and the phrase itself dates from the mid-1500s. Today it is often used as an exaggeration of ill health.

Death

Synonyms of death:
passing away, demise, decease, bereavement, loss, mourning, fatality, casualty.