Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms related to Dust

throw dust in eyes

throw dust in eyes

Meaning:
– to confuse or mislead somebody to deceive
– make a fool of

Examples:
1. She threw dust in the eyes of the jeweler by pretending to be a well-to-do lady, and then stole the jewellery.
2. The taxi drivers in Shimla throws dust in tourist’s eyes and take too much money for a small distance.
3. Give my whole money back; you cannot throw dust in my eyes.
4. The thug threw dust in her eyes and exchanged her real diamonds with fake stones.
5. The secretary of the film actress threw dust in the fan’s eyes, talking about a show at the airport when she was heading for the expressway.
6. Don’t ever earn money by throwing dust in customer’s eyes or soon you will lost your business.

Origin:
This idiomatic expression alludes to throwing dust or sand in the eyes to confuse a pursuing enemy. [Mid-1700s]

Throw dust in eyes Synonyms:
– Befool

bite the dust

bite the dust

Meaning

  • to fall to the ground
  • to die (possibly in battle)
  • to suffer a defeat
  • to disintegrate

Example Sentences

  1. The soldier bit the dust after a very long fight and even at that he managed to take many enemy soldiers with him.
  2. I am not going to bite the dust so easily because throughout my life I have been a fighter.
  3. Rose understands that taking this challenge could lead to her biting the dust and hence refrained from even the conversation.
  4. The sheriff is not going to bite the dust so easily. He has seen many such goons in his career.
  5. One of the gladiators would bite the dust at the end of the competition and that is how a winner would be decided.
  6. Uncle Tom only stopped working when he bit the dust.
  7. You will only understand the importance of having your family close by when you have to bite the dust. Until then they will remain worthless to you.
  8. One of the main reasons that he bit the dust so early in his career was because of his inflated ego.

Origin

The phrase originated as for tasting dust on the battle field but is currently used positively as well as negatively.