Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms beginning with E

everything but the kitchen sink

everything but the kitchen sink

Meaning

  • almost everything that one can think of
  • everything imaginable
  • a very large number of things, whether needed or not
  • much more than necessary number of things
  • just about everything

Example Sentences

  1. When he moved out of the house, he took along everything but the kitchen sink.
  2. They were going away for only a few days, but they packed everything but the kitchen sink.
  3. Have a look at this website. It talks of everything but the kitchen sink.
  4. When we were going on a vacation, my wife wanted to take everything but the kitchen sink.
  5. Our nearby store is a one-stop shop. You’ll find everything but the kitchen sink in there.
  6. When he and his colleague went on a trip to a remote place for work, he insisted on taking everything but the kitchen sink along.

Origin
The phrase originated around the early 1900s and the first print reference can be found in 1918 in the newspaper The Syracuse Herald. The expression became popular during World War II, where it was said that everything but the kitchen sink was thrown at the enemy. This lead to the erroneous belief that the phrase originated during WWII. Another variant of the phrase, “everything but the kitchen stove” predates this phrase and can be found in 1894 in the Jeffersonville National Democraft. The current phrase probably evolved this earlier phrase.

end of story

end of story

Meaning

  • there is  nothing more to add to the matter under discussion
  • the discussion is complete, nothing more to be said
  • said to emphasize that what is said is true there is no other possibility to change it
  • there is no more to be said

Example Sentences

  1. I did not invite her because I did not want her to come to my party. End of story.
  2. The bottom line is that they refused to extend our contract and did not pay us our dues. End of story.
  3. He said that he quit his job because he did not want to work in that company; end of story.
  4. I don’t believe that he did all those bad things they are saying he did, end of story.
  5. If you do not come on time for the early morning camping trip, we will leave without you, end of story.
  6. If you let go of this excellent opportunity, you will never get another one as good as this; end of story.
  7. If you do  not improve soon, you are going to lose your job, end of story.
  8. You took the decision, you have to stick to it. End of story.

Origin
This phrase originated in the USA.

every picture tells a story

every picture tells a story

Meaning

  • scene of happening that explains hidden reality
  • face or expressions that tells the truth or story
  • the idea of story as seen in any picture
  • hidden or unsaid explanation behind an outlook or sight

Example Sentences

  1. Shannon is denying but I am quite sure that she had done something wrong, every picture tells a story.
  2. Look at the face of Ricky he is so scared of being caught, every picture tells a story, he is the culprit.
  3. The emotions in this picture of a woman telling, she is in severe pain, every picture tells a story.
  4. Every picture tells a story and this is you who spoiled my painting, look at the paint on your hands and clothes, don’t try to make me fool.

Origin
The origin of the idiom “every picture tells a story” is fairly indistinct and unidentified till now. If you have any idea about it’s origin or meaning please share in comments.

This phrase lies slightly more in category of proverbs than the idioms.

eat humble pie

eat humble pie

Meaning

  • To become very humble in behaviour when someone points out a wrong doing by the person.
  • To admit an error and become submissive and apologetic in doing so.
  • When someone enforces an apology after a wrong has been committed.

Example Sentences

  1. I know for certain that the appliance should not be handled this way but if I turn out to be wrong then I’ll eat humble pie.
  2. One may often think that they are smarter than the others but such people always end up eating humble pie.
  3. The lawyer had to eat humble pie in the court because the facts he presented were wrong.

Origin
In the United Kingdom, what is known as offal meat which is the liver, heart, entrails of an animal was known as numbles in the early 14th century. Speculation is that the pies made from numbles eventually be came to know umbles through metanalysis (the process of change in the sound and the use of a word in the English language). Since 1330 the mention of numble or umble pies is common. Samuel Pepys used it in his diary at least on two occasions.

The word humble as an adjective means to have a low self-esteem. So the word play could have been to eat umble pie when feeling humble, which is a likely possibility of being the origin of the phrase.

every cloud has a silver lining

every cloud has a silver lining

Meaning:

  • there is something good in everything that’s bad
  • every negative occurrence has a positive aspect to it
  • every difficult or unpleasant situation has some advantage
  • some benefit can always be derived from a bad thing that happens

Example:

  1. Reena was depressed to be confined to bed after her surgery, but over time, when she could spend a lot of time with her family and catch up with old friends, who came to visit her, she realized that every cloud has a silver lining.
  2. Even though your relationship is going through a difficult phase, don’t despair, maybe this will strengthen your bond. Every cloud has a silver lining.
  3. Even though he had lost the match, he had gained in experience and was now more confident. Every cloud has a silver lining.
  4. Though he had failed his exam, he realized that every cloud has a silver lining, as now he could focus his attention on things he loved doing.
  5. I know that you job is not going well and you are stressed out, but don’t worry, things will be better soon. Every cloud has a silver lining.

Origin:
The phrase has been in use in this form and other forms since the mid 1800s.

early days

it’s early days yet

Meaning:

  • it is too soon to make a judgment about something
  • a time too soon to come to a conclusion
  • the starting phase of anything

Examples:

  1. The new measures seem to have worked, but it’s early days yet and the Reserve Bank of India Governor would rather not make any comment about the country’s economy.
  2. This is the last over of The Grand finale Cricket match, England could win but it’s early days yet.
  3. My new business is doing pretty well in terms of profit, but it’s early days.
  4. I anticipate my son will win the spelling contest this year, from his current presentation, but it is early days yet to be truly certain.
  5. In the early days of cars, the technology was not that advance as now.
  6. The humans are soon going to land on planets like earth outside our solar system, but it’s early days yet.

easier said than done

easier said than done
Meaning: something seems like a good idea, but it would be difficult to do.
Example: The doctor advised her to stop smoking and drinking but she is addicted so it is easier said than done for her.