Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Love Idioms

ask out

ask out

Meaning

  • invite someone to go out, especially on a date
  • invite someone to a social engagement
  • invite someone to go out socially, especially in order to start a romantic relationship
  • ask someone to go on a date

Example Sentences

  1. When he finally asked her out, she readily accepted, and very soon they were dating on a regular basis.
  2. Tom had asked Sue out for dinner, but she declined, saying she had other plans.
  3. Realizing that he was too shy to ask her out, she took it upon herself and asked him out for a movie and dinner afterwards.
  4. It was evident that she had feelings for him, and when asked her out, she could not say no, even though she had planned to be with her friends.
  5. She had asked Jim out for a date and they really enjoyed each other’s company.
  6. He said that he had asked her out several times, but she was simply not interested and refused every time.
  7. My friend asked us out for dinner to celebrate the success of his new venture.
  8. She said she would ask him out for lunch and discuss the plans with him then.

Origin
This phrase originated around the late 1800s.

end of story

end of story

Meaning

  • there is  nothing more to add to the matter under discussion
  • the discussion is complete, nothing more to be said
  • said to emphasize that what is said is true there is no other possibility to change it
  • there is no more to be said

Example Sentences

  1. I did not invite her because I did not want her to come to my party. End of story.
  2. The bottom line is that they refused to extend our contract and did not pay us our dues. End of story.
  3. He said that he quit his job because he did not want to work in that company; end of story.
  4. I don’t believe that he did all those bad things they are saying he did, end of story.
  5. If you do not come on time for the early morning camping trip, we will leave without you, end of story.
  6. If you let go of this excellent opportunity, you will never get another one as good as this; end of story.
  7. If you do  not improve soon, you are going to lose your job, end of story.
  8. You took the decision, you have to stick to it. End of story.

Origin
This phrase originated in the USA.

joined at the hip

joined at the hip

Meaning

  • two people who are inseparable
  • two people closely connected, or always together
  • two people who spend more time together than is usual

Example Sentences

  1. Chris and Jenny have been joined at the hip since they started dating each other a year ago. You would never see one without the other.
  2. Sally and I are very much in love, but we are not joined at the hip, you know. We very much have our own personal lives and space.
  3. Those two girls are more than just friends, they are like soul-sisters. They have been joined at the hip since the time they were in school.
  4. Those two seem to be joined at the hip. They are always together.
  5. Happy couples need not be the ones who are joined at the hip. In fact, couples who have a personal space tend to be happier in their relationships.

Origin
This expression originated in the USA during the 1960s and is derived from the condition of conjoined twins. Many assume that the term refers to Chang and Eng Bunker, who were an internationally celebrated pair of conjoined twins, and being from Siam (as Thailand was then called), were the source of the expression “Siamese twins”. However, this assumption is unlikely as they were joined at the sternum, not at the hips. This expression most likely makes a general reference to conjoined twins.

love child

love child

Meaning

  • a child born out of wedlock
  • a child born to parents who are not married to each other
  • an illegitimate child
  • a child whose father and mother are not married to each other

Example Sentences

  1. The new actress in that movie is rumoured to be the love child of one of the most famous actors of the previous generation.
  2. A huge scandal broke out when it was discovered that the hit onscreen couple had a love child.
  3. Betty and Larry’s affair led to a love child, and as a result Betty was spurned by her family.
  4. As a love child of a famous celebrity, he had it pretty hard during his early days, but in the in the end, he did quite well for himself.
  5. Charles and Tracy’s short but passionate affair resulted in a love child, whom both of them decided to take care of together.
  6. The influential leader’s political career came crashing down when the news broke out that he had a love child with one of his junior party members.
  7. The company director had to step down when it was discovered that he was have an affair with a colleague and even had a love child with her.

Origin
This phrase was first used in 1805.

sealed with a kiss

sealed with a kiss

also sealed with a loving kiss, SWAK or SWALK (acronym)

Meaning

  • written and sent with love and care

Example Sentences

  1. When Ted and Judy were living apart in different cities, he would write a letter to her every week and all the letters would be marked with SWAK, or sealed with a kiss, as a mark of how much he loved her.
  2. His presents may be small and humble, but I cherish them because all of them are sealed with a kiss.
  3. In old times, before the age of the internet, lovers would write letters to each other, and these love letters would be sealed with a kiss.
  4. He wrote a beautiful letter to her, and, to further express his love, sealed it with a kiss.
  5. When he was away for prolonged periods on work, he would frequently write letters to her and write SWAK at the back of the envelope, to signify that it was sealed with a kiss.

Origin
The acronym of this phrase, SWAK or SWALK, was commonly written on envelopes sent by servicemen to their lovers during the World War I & II. In medieval times, contracts were were not considered legal until the signers included an X to represent Saint Andrew and would then kiss the X to prove his sincerity.

no love lost

no love lost

also little love lost, no / little love lost between

Meaning

  • there is a mutual dislike between two people
  • there is no feeling of respect or affection between two people
  • two people who do not like each other
  • ill will, hate, animosity between two people

Example Sentences

  1. Bob and Jill cannot get along together. There is no love lost between them.
  2. The brothers were always at loggerheads with each other, There was little love lost between them.
  3. There was no love lost between Sam and Dennis. They could never work together.
  4. He and his agent had a curious relationship. Although they had to work together all the time, there was no love lost between them.
  5. Tracy and Sandra don’t even acknowledge each other’s presence when they are together for some reason. There is no love lost between them.
  6. Stuart and Harry had been friends once, but after they had a big fallout a few years back, now there is little love lost between them.
  7. He did not care that his business partner was going through difficult times; there was no love lost between them, although they worked together.

Origin
This phrase originated in the 1500s and till the 1800s, meant either there was extreme love or extreme hate. In current usage, though, it signifies hate exclusively.

love to death

love to death

Meaning

  • love someone very much
  • feel extremely strong affection for someone
  • love someone all your life, i.e., till you die

Example Sentences

  1. He is prepared to do anything for her, go to any extent. He loves her to death.
  2. The old woman loved her husband to death. Even when he was no more, she kept his memories alive by keeping his belongings close to her.
  3. Before they had got married, he had said that he would love her to death, but when the goings got tough, he deserted her.
  4. “Do you think she is in love with him?” “Oh, didn’t you know? She loves him to death and has been waiting for him since ages, but he is playing hard to get.”
  5. He loved her to death, and said that he could not stop loving her even when he knew that she had been unfaithful to him.
  6. She said she was prepared to leave back everything and go with him wherever he went because she loved him to death.
  7. He had loved her to death, and said that he could not be with any other woman apart from her.

Origin
The origin of the idiomatic express is yet not known, but your contribution is required if you’ve any clue.

the course of true love never did run smooth

the course of true love never did run smooth

Meaning

  • people in love often have to overcome difficulties in order to be with each other
  • true love always has difficulties
  • there will always be problems in a romantic relationship

Example Sentences

  1. Judy and I are in a long distance relationship and it is not easy staying away from each other. The course of true love never did run smooth.
  2. Sean and Jessica had to overcome a lot of social hurdles and restrictions before they could finally be with each other. The course of true love never did run smooth.
  3. When they decided to get married, they faced stiff resistance and even rejection from their families because the match was not a socially acceptable one. The course of true love never did run smooth.
  4. She had to sacrifice her career and leave her close friends behind to be with her boyfriend when he decided to move to another city. The course of true love never did run smooth.
  5. They had been through a lot of lows during their decade long relationship, but they always supported each other through everything. The course of true love never did run smooth.

Origin
This expression was first used by William Shakespeare in his play “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” in 1598.

one cannot love and be wise

one cannot love and be wise

Meaning

  • people often do foolish things when they are in love
  • people often fall in love with a person they are not compatible with
  • people behave strangely when in love

Example Sentences

  1. I don’t think it is wise of Elsie and Ray to decide to get married so soon into their relationship. But then, one cannot love and be wise.
  2. Everyone can see that she will not be a good match for him, but he seems to be head over heels in love with her. Well, one cannot love and be wise.
  3. I know that one cannot love and be wise, but still I would like her to at least think about her decision to marry him.
  4. Nick and Gina have decided to get married, but I don’t think they are ready for it yet. But then, one cannot love and be wise.
  5. Would it be wise of them to go for the adventure trip in this weather? Well, one cannot love and be wise.
  6. One cannot love and be wise, the saying goes; and he proved it when he made a fool of himself in front of all those people.

Origin
This phrase originated during the early 16th century.

all is fair in love and war

all is fair in love and war

Meaning

  • in situations of love and war you do not have to obey rules of reasonable behaviour
  • in love and war, people are not bound by rules of fair play
  • in certain situations, like love or war, you are allowed to be deceitful to fulfill your objectives
  • in highly charged situations, even any method of achieving your goals is acceptable
  • certain situations are so overwhelming that acting in your own selfish interest is justifiable

Example Sentences

  1. In order to go on a date with Elle, Paul tricked her into believing that her boyfriend was seeing another woman. Well, all’s fair in love and war.
  2. When Ray realised that his best friend and he were attracted to the same girl, he made every effort to put him down in front of her. All’s fair in love and war.
  3. He kept asking her out although she had said no several times – all’s fair in love and war.
  4. He did not tell her of his past lest she rejected him – all’s fair in love and war.

Origin
This phrase, in its current form, was first found in the novel “Frank Fairlegh” by Frank E. Smedley in 1850. Very similar phrases with the same meaning are found in the 1620 translation of Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote II by Tom Sheldon and the 1845 novel Smuggler II by G.P.R. James. Even prior to that, love has been equated to lawlessness and trickery since 1578-1579.

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