Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms beginning with M

monkey business

monkey business

Meaning:

  • silly act
  • dishonest tricks
  • to fool around
  • immoral or a deceitful conduct
  • illegal activities

Example:

  1. I want to sleep. Stop disturbing me by your monkey business.
  2. Aren’t you tired of having done monkey business whole day, leaving your preparation for test tomorrow.
  3. Children continued their monkey business until the teacher arrived in class.
  4. The government is levying fine on those who have been doing monkey business by tampering with their electricity meters.
  5. There is nothing new in selling adulterated food items in local markets by shopkeepers. It’s their old monkey business.
  6. Do not get involved in monkey business over the internet. Cyber Laws are stricter than before.
  7. Now passport application has been made available online so that innocent people do not get tricked into monkey business of those who claim to get passports made in less than 3 days.

Origin:
Monkey business has its roots in the term Monkeyshine. This word was originated in 1832 and meant “dishonorable act;” it was used in the Jim Crow song which mocked African-American slaves. In earlier times parents in England warned their children against bad conduct termed as monkey tricks. The idiom was first recorded in print in 1883 in W. Peck’s Bad Boy: “There must be no monkey business going on.”

make common cause with

make common cause with
Meaning: work together in order to achieve something that both groups want.
Example: Environment protesters have made common cause with local people to stop the setting up of the factories and iron industries on fertile land.

make it big

make it big

Meaning

  • become very successful or famous
  • to be extremely successful financially
  • to flourish in life and become prominent
  • used to express admiration for other’s success

Example Sentences

  1. I always knew that someday my life would flip and I would make it big.
  2. My brother made it big, but then he got addicted to drugs and lost it all.
  3. After 20 years of trying his luck, he finally won a lottery and made it big.
  4. Helen said,”You made it big! I am really happy for you and your kids.”
  5. Look at that necklace Rebecca! I always knew you would make it big.
  6. It is almost impossible to make it big in a country like America without contacts.
  7. Commitment is all you will ever need if you really want to make it big in this industry. You have a lot of competition here.
  8. It depends on you if you really want to make it big. You just need to work for it man!
  9. I just met Tony today at the mall. He made it big, man. He owns the Latest software company.
  10. Regardless of being very skilled it took him numerous years before he made it big in the New Your city

Origin

The origin of this idiomatic expression is not known to us. If you know more details about the origin of the idiom, please write it in the comments.

mean business

mean business

Meaning

  • to be focused about achieving a goal
  • to take a serious action or intend to do something very seriously
  • in the very earnest way
  • usually used in terms of going against general opinion to achieve a goal

Example Sentences

  1. She meant business when she said that she will take the number one position in the tennis world.
  2. The fire in his eyes speak that he means business.
  3. He meant business when he called the police for the continuous noise that the neighbours had been making.
  4. The driver meant business when he claimed he could get us to our destination is one night.
  5. I meant business and have finally got the contract to the biggest deal of my life.
  6. She means business and has not come so far to run around in circles.
  7. Government offices in this place do not mean business, the people employed there are very lethargic.
  8. The baby means business when he sees his toys in someone else’s hands.
  9. The firmness with which the new government has initiated certain measure shows that it mean business.

Origin

The origination comes from the seriousness that entrepreneurs adopt when conducting their business and how important it is to achieve success. But the literary origin of this phrase cannot be traced accurately.

make the best of

make the best of

Meaning

  • to look for a positive side of a seemingly negative situation
  • a situation that is not favourable but has to be accepted
  • something that cannot be controlled or changed and hence is accepted as it is

Example Sentences

  1. The sun was shining so he made the best of his day and went to the beach with his family.
  2. I make the best of what I have because hiring people at such close proximities is no longer feasible for my business.
  3. To make the best of the situation is the first sign of a successful human being.
  4. Although she was reluctant, when she got a better job then she decided to make the best of it and took the offer.
  5. I did not want to move to the other city initially but now that the situation demands it, I have decided to make the best of
  6. She makes the best of dishes with leftover food items.

Origin

The phrase is used in simple English parlance, usually in terms of a job and its revolving situation. The origin as well as first literary use of this phrase cannot be traced specifically.

Synonym

  • make the best of a bad job

make a beeline for

make a beeline for
Meaning: go quickly and directly to somebody or something.
Example: As soon as the employees heard about the news of scrapping of the bonus policy, they made a beeline for the boss’s office.

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