Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms related to Money

on one’s uppers

on one’s uppers

Meaning:

  • extremely short of money
  • destitute
  • poor

Example:

  1. All the artists in their initial phase of career were on their uppers. They have struggled enough to reach this level of success.
  2. The owner of Blue Dart was once on his uppers when he had a few thousands in his bank. It is when he took risk & by favour of his luck, he has a successful business now.
  3. It is good that you want to follow your passion & be a dancer but you must remember that during one phase you’ll be on your uppers. So decide & plan accordingly.
  4. The actor when first came to Mumbai was on his uppers & slept near the beach. It is then he dreamt of having a mansion near the beach & today he owns not one but two of them.
  5. I am on my uppers now & I knew this would happen some day. Following your passion isn’t as dreamy as it seems.
  6. He helped his friend who was on his uppers & had no money to record his album. His one good deed got his friend selected for vocals of an upcoming movie.

Origin:
In this expression, worn-out shoes are taken as an indication of someone’s poverty; the upper is the part of a shoe above the sole, which is all that is left after the sole has been worn away.

well-to-do

well-to-do

Meaning:
– rich and of good social status
– having plenty of money and possessions
– in favorable circumstances
– in fortunate circumstances financially

Well-to-do Synonyms:
wealthy, rich, well-off, well-healed, affluent, Prosperous, comfortable, loaded.

Examples:
1. In the capital’s well-to-do suburbs, hiring a security guard has become a must for every family.
2. People living below poverty line protested against the new tax bill that favored the well-to-dos.
3. Most of well-to-do parents send their wards to London for study.
4. One friend mine is quite well-to-do and she is kind heart.
5. They are lucky who born in a well-to-do family.
6. I was not born in well-to-do family, but I worked really hard to reach this level.
7. He was a quite well-to-do business man but left everything becomes a Buddhist monk.

Usage:
well-to-do often used with quite.

Origin:
[1805–25]

at a discount

at a discount

Meaning:
– not valuable or not in worth
– at a lower price than usual
– below the nominal value
– held in low esteem
– out of favor
– poorly esteemed
– depreciated
– offering or selling at reduced prices

Examples:
1. Freedom fighters are at a discount in the present politics.
2. Carl bought that necklace at a discount which Emily wanted to have since last 2 years.
3. I won’t purchase an Apple iPhone until i can get one at a discount.
4. Honesty and goodness is at a discount in this selfish and cruel world.
5. It’s a winter sale at this garment shop today and you can purchase your favorite cloths at a discount.
6. Yesterday, I bought two burgers at a discount at McDonald’s restaurant.

Origin:
The first usage, mainly found in business and commerce, dates from about 1700. The figurative usage is about a century newer.

Discount synonyms:
reduction, money off, markdown, price cut, cut rate, concession and reduce

dirt cheap

dirt cheap

Meaning:
– very cheap
– almost free
– at an extremely low cost
– quite inexpensive

Examples:
1. Its quite a useful book, but luckily I could buy it dirt cheap at a junk shop.
2. Take few more of those water colors for painting they’re dirt cheap.
3. In United Kingdom, the carrots are dirt cheap.
4. Outsourcing sounds a great deal to earn money here in India, but for the people of western world it is dirt cheap.
5. The SUV truck required a huge mechanical job work, but still it was dirt-cheap.
6. I bought this welding machine dirt cheap but not working the way I want, a bad idea.
7. Don’t buy these dirt cheap electronic equipment, they are useless.

Origin:
1815–25, America.
Although the idea dates back to ancient times, the precise expression, literally meaning “as cheap as dirt,” replaced the now obsolete dog cheap. [Early 1800s]

Dirt Synonyms:
grime, filth, mud, dust, muck, soil, earth, clay.

Cheap Synonyms:
inexpensive, contemptible, despicable, low priced, economical, discounted, not expensive, shameful.

down and out

down and out

Meaning:
– homeless or penniless person
– someone who has no home, no job and no money
– poor and unlucky, bumming and boozing
– poor person who need help
– lacking funds, resources, or prospects; destitute

Examples:
1. After losing his job, he was left down and out.
2. I just assumed he was a down and out, begging on the street corner.
3. She was one of the many down-and-outers waiting for the soup kitchen to open.
4. When he was down and out, he went to the Salvation Army.

Origin:
Lacking funds or prospects; destitute, penniless. For example, After losing his job, car, and home, he was completely down and out. This term probably originated in boxing, where it alludes to the fighter who is knocked down and stays down for a given time, thereby losing the bout.

A boxer who is “down” has been knocked to the canvas, and one who is also “out” is unconscious or unable to resume the fight; thus a down-and-out boxer is utterly defeated. AHDI states the term “probably” came from boxing, circa 1900; OED references boxing rather obliquely, and cites first figurative usage to 1889.