Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms related to Rich

filthy rich

filthy rich

Meaning

  • Someone who is rich beyond measure.
  • Often refers to someone who has become rich by using unfair means.

Example Sentences

  1. His father is filthy rich so obviously he is not worried about choosing the right university. He can get admission in any of them that he chooses.
  2. Everyone is not able to get filthy rich like you, some people have to work hard for even mediocre success.
  3. To be filthy rich means that you can choose and buy whatever you want, window shopping is for the less fortunate.

Origin
The word lucre, in and around the 1400’s meant money or riches, but pointed to it negatively. The filthy part in this expression points out to something that has been done unduly. At the time foul or filthy lucre were popular which eventually changed to ‘filthy rich’.

In 1526, William Tindale used it in his work. In the 1900’s the phrase came back and became more popular than it was originally. In 1929, an Ohio newspaper used the phrase to show the get rich quick attitudes that prevailed back then. Filthy rich is no longer used in just a negative way, it could be referring to the magnitude of richness too.

well-to-do

well-to-do

Meaning:
– rich and of good social status
– having plenty of money and possessions
– in favorable circumstances
– in fortunate circumstances financially

Well-to-do Synonyms:
wealthy, rich, well-off, well-healed, affluent, Prosperous, comfortable, loaded.

Examples:
1. In the capital’s well-to-do suburbs, hiring a security guard has become a must for every family.
2. People living below poverty line protested against the new tax bill that favored the well-to-dos.
3. Most of well-to-do parents send their wards to London for study.
4. One friend mine is quite well-to-do and she is kind heart.
5. They are lucky who born in a well-to-do family.
6. I was not born in well-to-do family, but I worked really hard to reach this level.
7. He was a quite well-to-do business man but left everything becomes a Buddhist monk.

Usage:
well-to-do often used with quite.

Origin:
[1805–25]