Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

straight from the horse’s mouth

straight from the horse’s mouth

Meaning:

  • from a dependable or reliable source
  • from the highest authority
  • from someone who has personal knowledge
  • from a direct or firsthand source

Example:

  1. What you heard is true. I know since I heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.
  2. I don’t believe it that he’s leaving. I’m going to go to him and hear it straight from the horse’s mouth.
  3. You need not believe me. Go talk to him and hear it straight from the horse’s mouth.
  4. I know that they are getting married. I heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.
  5. Don’t trust what you hear on the grapevine. Its best to hear it straight from the horse’s mouth so you know its true.
  6. Why do you want to go to the rumour mongers when you can get it straight from the horse’s mouth?
  7. That news came straight from the horse’s mouth, so its true.

Origin:
The origin of this phrase has reference to horse racing. Tips on the likely winner are circulated among the punters. They most trusted source are the ones closest to the horse, the stable boys. The phrase goes one step further and better, i.e, from the horse itself. It has been used since the early 1900s.

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