Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

use your loaf

use your loaf

Meaning

  • To tell someone to use their brain more in analysing what they are doing.
  • To use common sense.
  • This phrase is used in an angry tone.
  • It is an old fashioned UK way of talking to tell someone to be more mindful.
  • ‘Loaf’ here is equivalent to ‘head’.

Example Sentences

  1. I do not like it that you talk about people’s disabilities so often. You ought to use your loaf and understand that you may be hurting someone’s sentiments.
  2. Is it so hard to use your loaf and understand how much pain she is going through currently?
  3. “I do not mind going through it again but when writing the exam you will need to use your loaf and get it right”, said the angry mother to her daughter.

Origin
In World War One, the soldiers would dig trenches and hid in it for days until the firing reduced or stopped. If a soldier in this situation wanted to come out he could not risk his head out first since he would very likely be shot and killed. Soldiers would use a loaf of bread and stick it out first to see if the snipers are still around. This is when loaf became a synonym for this phrase to come into existence.

This idiom was originated in United Kingdom of Great Britain.

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