Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms beginning with Y

yellow streak

yellow streak

Meaning

  • people who  have an inclination towards being fainthearted.
  • referring to a cowardly trait in a person’s temperament.
  • a  fault or a weak trait in a person’s disposition.
  • used for people who aren’t courageous.

Example Sentences

  1. Ginna’s got a yellow streak which shows up the moment she is asked to stand up against Nick.
  2. Why don’t you just go and get rid of the yellow streak, huh?
  3. “Hard luck for the people who have a yellow streak because we will show no mercy today soldiers!”
  4. Why don’t you show these people that even a person with a yellow streak  like your’s can trek through this mountain terrain?
  5. “I need to get rid of this yellow streak somehow,” she muttered, wiping the tears in her eyes.
  6. My cousin says that his yellow streak is a plus point for him as it keeps him sane and saves him from getting into any trouble.
  7. They say that Edward has a yellow streak but trust me I have seen nothing but courage in him?

Origin

The origin of this Idiom is from the European culture in which color yellow is linked to being cowardly or craven. The idioms yellow-bellied or just yellow are also used for fainthearted people or for people who aren’t brave.

year-round

year-round

Meaning

  • happening in continuation throughout the whole year
  • taking place as much as possible through the year

Example Sentences

  1. The park provides free food for orphans year-round as a service to the God and humanity.
  2. Huggies gave them a year-round supply of diapers so that it could be distributed amongst the poor in that area.
  3. The FBI headquarters operate year-round to keep crime rates to a minimum.
  4. 50 seats are reserved for exchange students year-round.
  5. There was a year-round supply of goods, food, utensils and clothes by the king in the memory of his beloved wife Maria.
  6. We have hospital beds reserved for pneumonia patients, cancer patients, pregnant females and twenty percent reservation in case of an epidemic year-round.
  7. She prayed to the gods for rain all year-round as she believed that her prayers would be answered and there would be harvest in the fields again.
  8. Himachal Pradesh has a cold and pleasant climate and skiing on the snow-covered mountains  year-round which are an attraction for all the tourists.
  9. The year-round bill for the usage of AC’s during summer season and heaters during the winter season in India is astronomical and it leaves a very negative impact on the environment and influences global warming.

Origin

The idiom was first used in 1924.

young turk

young turk

Meaning

  • a young person who has many new ideas and wants a reform
  • a young person eager for rigorous re-order to the established order.
  • a member of one or more of the insurgent groups in Turkey in the late 19th century who rebelled against Ottoman’s rule
  • a young person who is defiant and insubordinate to dominate in a company, team or organization.

Example Sentences

  1. The beginning of the young turk’s party was after they started becoming organized and confident of their power and abilities.
  2. It is a very famous saying that the young turk could conquer the hearts of beautiful girls even as their enemy.
  3. The thought of leaving his mother and family in order to fight a war which was not even his truly saddened the young turk .
  4. Shivaji Maharaj was a young turk that could not be tamed and he thirsted glory and victory in all his wars.

Origin

The origin of this Idiom can be traced back to as early as 1929 when a group of people who were fervent  about reforms were known as ‘Young Turks’. The figurative expression of the idiom ‘young turks’  means ‘the new breed, impatient for change’.The Three Pashas – Mehmed Talaat (aged 34 in 1908), Ismail Enver (27) and Ahmed Djemal (36), were called the ‘Young Turks’ because they were members of Turkish Nationalist party and led the Turkish revolution of 1908.The idiom was later used by  American President Churchill when he disagreed with some of Prime Minister’s argument.He said,”You’re just like the Young Turks in my government.”.

year dot

year dot

Meaning

  • A long time back.
  • It refers to an incident that happened so long ago that it was not possible to keep a track of when it actually was.
  • An informal way of saying as long back as one can remember.

Example Sentences

  1. I have been living in this house since the year dot and know everyone in the vicinity by their first names.
  2. My mom makes this cheesecake since the year dot and I am yet to taste anything that is better.
  3. This lawyer is set up in the uptown area since the year dot because his business is much better there with influential clients walking in all the time.
  4. His uncle is in the deciding committee since the year dot, of course he got in without any issues.
  5. We’ve been friends since the year dot.

Origin
This is a modern day phrase which came up in England in the 1900’s. It is most popular within the Great Britain region but is not used as much in the rest of the world. Henry Murray used it in his literary work in the year 1897 in ‘Lands of the slave and the free: or, Cuba, The United States, and Canada’.

you are what you eat

you are what you eat

Meaning:

  • if you eat good food you will be healthy, if you eat bad food you will be unhealthy
  • to be hit and healthy, you need to eat good food
  • eat well to feel well

Example:

  1. To stay healthy, it’s best to keep off junk food. You are what you eat.
  2. You are what you eat, so watch you diet and don’t eat unhealthy foods.
  3. “I feel more energetic and fit now that I’ve given up processed food and eat more freshly prepared local and seasonal foods.” “You are what you eat.”
  4. Athletes and sports persons are so fit because not only do they exercise regularly, but they also watch what they eat. After all, you are what you eat.
  5. We attended a seminar called “you are what you eat”, which advocated the benefits of a healthy diet.

Origin:
The phrase was first used in English in the early 1900s. It refers idea that food controls a person’s health. Similar phrases had earlier been used in French and German in the 1800s. During the hippy era of 1960s, the phrase gained much prominence as it was adopted by the hippies as a slogan for healthy eating.

your guess is as good as mine

your guess is as good as mine

Meaning:

  • do not know the answer
  • to have no idea
  • don’t know any more than the other person

Example:

  1. If you want to know which one is the best of these movies, well, your guess is as good as mine.
  2. “How far do you think this place is?” “Your guess is as good as mine.”
  3. “As to who will win this time, your guess is as good as mine.”
  4. I asked her when the shipment would arrive, she said “your guess is as good as mine.”
  5. “Do you know what he is doing?” “Your guess is as good as mine.”
  6. I asked the mechanic whether the device will work properly if repaired, he said “your guess is as good as mine.”
  7. “How long do you think we should have to wait for the bus?” “Your guess is as good as mine.”
  8. “Will this train reach on time?” “Your guess is as good as mine.”

Origin:
The origin of this phrase is not very clear, but it is a fairly recent phrase. It is a simple phrase and used very often.

yesterday’s man

yesterday’s man

Meaning:

  • someone especially a politician whose career is finished
  • someone who has passed the peak of his or her career

Example:

  1. The officer is retiring from his job next month, soon he will be a yesterday’s man.
  2. It had only been a week when Ria’s saloon kick-started and now due to financial crisis she’ll be closing her shop. She’s a yesterday’s man now.
  3. No sooner had the actor done a blockbuster, he was accused of his involvement in a scam & prisoned. He is a yesterday’s man now.
  4. Only after an hour of his being elected as home minister, the media dismissed him as a yesterday’s man due to wrong means of buying votes.
  5. You have to be cautious & not make any mistake at this point of your career else you will be a yesterday’s man.
  6. After being involved in drug addiction & gambling, the singer became a yesterday’s man.
  7. If you do not want to be a yesterday’s man, keep learning & improving yourself so that you keep evolving.
  8. It is essential to be up to date with the ongoing trend in your field of work else you’ll be a yesterday’s man.

Origin:
Any information about the origin of this idiom is currently unavailable with us.

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